1945 to 1950

After the war interlude, Vittorio was ready to throw himself into races with renewed enthusiasm, and the victories started to pour in straight away. In 1946, the Stanguellini Team won the absolute Sport national championship and grasped prestigious approval in the Belgian Gran Prix with Bertani's 1100, which beat the Simca-Gordini driven by Amedeo Gordini himself. The successes multiplied in 1947. In the car racing fervour which had infected the Italians, no Sunday went by without the victory of a car built or formulated by Stanguellini. It was not unusual for them to beat cars in the higher classes. With a pinch of good luck, young Auricchio won the Pescara Gran Prix with the 1100 Sport, beating Cortese's Ferrari 125S. But then on the Cascine track in Florence, the same driver in the trusty Stanguellini 1100 again beat Ferrari with full merit, with no extenuating circumstances. From 1947 to the early nineteen fifties, the fast little Modenese Barchetta Sport underwent a radical technical evolution. The frames were fully built in the shop, using high resistance steel pipes to provide great rigidity and a lower weight, while the suspensions and back axles continued to be of Fiat origin. In 1949, the first twin-camshaft head was built from square one for the 1100 engine, and this involved complex work on the standard Fiat cylinder block. In 1950, the new 750 twin-camshaft engine fully built by Stanguellini, in which wide use was made of lightweight alloy, was formulated on the basis of encouraging experiences with the 1100 engine (in the Round Sicily race Sergio Sighinolfi gained a record that remained unbeaten for years). The two twin-camshaft engines became the war-horse which was synonymous with the Modenese car builder's work.